Is Pot Safe for Dogs?

Is Pot Safe for Dogs?

Is Pot Safe for Dogs

We won’t get into the nitty gritty on the arguments for and against marijuana, but there are a few things concerned veterinarians do want you to know about pot and your dog.

DOGS CAN (AND DO) GET HIGH

Yes, your dog can get high by inhaling marijuana smoke and/or ingesting pot edibles. The difference is, dogs feel “high” much, much more intensely than humans do. Dogs are likely to find any state of altered reality extremely distressing.

HOW CAN YOU TELL IF YOUR DOG IS “HIGH?”

If your dog is in the room while you’re smoking marijuana, it’s entirely possible for him to get a “contact high.” Dogs have also been known to eat marijuana buds, and of course, edibles are tempting to them, too. If you’re unsure whether or not your dog may have inadvertently gotten into your weed, look for the following signs:

  • Dilated pupils
  • Drooling
  • Low blood pressure/heart rate
  • Unsteadiness
  • Easily startled
Is Pot Safe for Dogs?

CAN POT HURT MY DOG?

In a nutshell, yes. There are too few vet-sponsored studies on the effects of marijuana on dogs to know for sure whether or not it’s safe. Never give your dog weed, particularly without first talking to your vet. (Caveat: Some veterinarians believe in prescribing medical marijuana products that do not contain THC for dogs that require pain relief.) Although pot probably won’t kill your dog, it could make him very sick. Small animals are particularly susceptible to effects of pot. Vets working in states that legalized marijuana such as Colorado have reported an uptick in dogs coming in with symptoms of marijuana ingestion. Especially if you’re unsure just how much marijuana your pet has in his system, be sure to get him to an emergency vet right away if you suspect he’s been in your stash. Vet treatment for pot ingestion can include IV fluids, careful monitoring, and even by applying oxygen. Remember that even if pot isn’t necessarily “toxic” to your dog, the ingredients in some edibles might be.

MARIJUANA TOXICITY IN PETS

With its legalization in various states across the United States, marijuana is becoming very common in households for medicinal purposes. In fact, over the past 6 years, Pet Poison Helpline has experienced a 448% increase in marijuana cases. Here’s what you should know about marijuana ingestion in pets.

Marijuana or Cannabis sativa/Cannabis indica is used for recreational drug use and for medicinal purposes. Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) are the two most commonly recognized, utilized, and studied cannabinoids although there are over 80 different cannabinoids in marijuana plants. The primary difference between the two is that THC causes psychotropic effects and has a moderate level of toxicity while CBD is non-psychotropic and is felt by many investigators to be non-toxic or have limited toxicity. The exact amount of each cannabinoid varies widely from strain to strain and plant to plant.

Cannabidiol is thought to have the following properties: anxiolytic, antipsychotic, antiemetic, anti-seizure, and anti-inflammatory. Medically, THC is used in attempt to alleviate muscle spasms caused by multiple sclerosis, nausea from chemotherapy, weight loss in AIDS patients, seizure disorders and Crohn’s disease. Tetrahydrocannabinol is also used recreationally for its psychotropic effects.

Animals can be poisoned by marijuana in different ways. They can ingest marijuana edibles such as brownies or pot butter, ingest the owner’s supply of marijuana (in any formulation), or by second hand smoke. Common symptoms of marijuana toxicity include sedation/lethargy, dilated pupils or glassed over eyes, dazed expression, difficulty walking and vomiting. Other symptoms can include either a low or high heart rate, vocalization such as whining or crying, agitation, trouble regulating temperature causing the body temperature to drop or rise and incontinence/dribbling urine, tremors, seizures and potentially coma. Signs of toxicity can be seen anywhere from 5 minutes to 12 hours after the animal is exposed to marijuana. The signs can potentially last 30 minutes to several days depending on the dose ingested.

Although there is no true antidote for marijuana, veterinarians can give supportive care to help the pet through the clinical signs. Vets can regulate the temperature of the animal to ensure they aren’t too hot or cold and give fluids to help maintain hydration. They can give anti-vomiting medication to help stop fluid loss and closely monitor the animal’s heart rate to ensure that it is stable. Due to the animal having trouble walking and potentially injuring itself, the clinic staff can help keep the pet comfortable and confined so they won’t be injured. In a lot of cases, a veterinarian may give activated charcoal. This is a liquid that the animal drinks or is given that can help bind the toxin in the stomach or intestines to the charcoal and prevent absorption into the body.

Animals normally do well with supportive care, however large ingestions of marijuana can be dangerous. Common problems with diagnosing and treating marijuana cases in the veterinary clinic are due to incomplete history which could be due to drug stigma, the owners on vacation, pharmaceutical products or worries about legal repercussions. It is important to get a complete history and reassure owners that the clinic is only interested in providing appropriate medical care for their pet. Accurate and complete medical history is imperative so that only necessary treatments are provided and prevent unnecessary treatments and costs.

With marijuana being legalized in many different states, there has been an increase since last year with many additional cases of poisonings reported. Getting accurate medical history is important in treating pets appropriately and without unnecessary treatments. Some tips for helping prevent toxicity include placing marijuana edibles well out of reach of the pet in closed high cabinets or in a locked drawer when not in use. If marijuana is being smoked, the pet should be kept in a separate area with good ventilation until the smoke has cleared. This will help prevent many of the marijuana poisonings from occurring.

If you find yourself in a medical emergency, call your veterinarian or Pet Poison Helpline at 800-213-6680. We are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week even on holidays to help with pet poison emergencies.

Is Pot Safe for Dogs?

How do cats and dogs become intoxicated?

Cats and dogs can become intoxicated by cannabis in various ways; by inhaling second-hand smoke, eating edibles (baked goods, candies, chocolate bars, and chips containing cannabis), or ingesting cannabis directly (in any form). Most exposures are accidental when curious pets discover access to the drug or when they are present in the same room with a person smoking cannabis. Dogs have more cannabinoid receptors in their brains, which means the effects of cannabis are more dramatic and potentially more toxic when compared to humans. A small amount of cannabis is all it takes to cause toxicity in cats and dogs.

Regardless of the method of exposure, accurate and complete information is imperative to treating the patient successfully. For example, ingestion of a ‘pot brownie’ needs different treatment than inhalation, because eating the brownie requires treatment for cannabis and chocolate toxicity, whereas inhalation may require additional treatment for respiratory irritation.

How does cannabis affect cats and dogs?

Like most drugs, the effects of cannabis are based on chemistry. The drug enters the body via inhalation or ingestion and binds with specific neuroreceptors in the brain, altering normal neurotransmitter function. THC interacts with neurotransmitters such as norepinephrine, dopamine, serotonin, and acetylcholine. Humans and pets have two types of receptors in their bodies. One type, CB1, affects the central nervous system, and the other, CB2, affects the peripheral tissues. Although not all the pharmacologic mechanisms triggered by cannabinoids have been identified, it is thought that CB1 is responsible for most of the effects of cannabis.

Everything that enters the body has to exit the body. THC is very lipid-soluble, which means that it is easily stored in the fatty tissue in the liver, brain, and kidneys before being eliminated from the body. THC is metabolized in the liver and the majority (65-90%) is excreted in the feces, while a small percentage (10-35%) is eliminated through the kidneys. The drug has to be metabolized and excreted for the effects to wear off.

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